INTERNATIONAL DAY OF BIODIVERSITY 2010
 

Previous action days


A cooperation of


On behalf of



Nicaragua: Biodiversity at one of the most active volcanoes in the world

Anuncio

Excursion to Masaya Volcano

Excursión al Volcán Masaya

Links

Downloads

Video

Gallery

Anuncio

Anuncio original del evento en este sitio web (Abril 2010)


Excursion to Masaya Volcano

Texto en español más abajo


The 'Parque Nacional Volcán Masaya' was created in 1979 and is Nicaragua’s largest and second oldest National Park (51km2). The Masaya caldera is one of a complex of a nested set of calderas and craters, formed around 2500 yrs ago. Since then, a new basaltic complex has formed from eruptions within the Masaya caldera, and include the Masaya, Santiago and Nindiri cones. The first recorded eruption was in 1670 and the last major one was in 1772. A more moderate one occurred in 1853. The volcano erupted frequently but mildly through the 20th century; in 2001 a minor eruption occurred, sending tubes of lava rocks and debris onto the hillside. 2003 an eruption cloud rose to a height of ~4.6 km. The volcano Masaya continually emits large amounts of sulphur dioxide gas.


The active volcano is surrounded by rough black lava rocks and areas of well protected dry forest. It offers a spectacular view into a deep smoking crater, and supports a unique ecosystem dominated by Nicaragua’s National Flower 'Sacuanjoche' (Plumeria alba) (also known as 'Frangipani') and 'Cachito' (Stemmadenia obovato). Colonies of parakeets nest in holes in the crater walls and various species of bats live in lava tunnels and caves.


The Park attracts around 120 000 tourists per year and is the most visited natural site in the country. Well trained park rangers guide tourists to the different parts of the Park to see the geology, flora and fauna of the National Park and to visit the very informative eco-museum.


To top

The Action Day

In May 2010, the Ministry of Environment and Natural Resources (MARENA), supported by the Nicaraguan Network for Biodiversity (ReniBio), organized Biodiversity Action Day as part of the three-day national forum on biodiversity in Nicaragua. This included a two-day conference (comprising symposia on protected area management, wetland management, and biodiversity monitoring) and a two-day event in 358 public schools all over the country. Over 14,500 schoolchildren learned about the value of biodiversity, and they planted 17 500 native trees. The different activities were supported by the World Bank, UNDP and the German Government.


The 'Parque Nacional Volcán Masaya' was chosen for the Biodiversity Action Day because of its unique ecosystem, its good infrastructure and facilities, and its proximity (20km) to the capital of Nicaragua, Managua.


At 6am dawn was breaking on 22nd of May 2010 in the 'Parque Nacional Volcán Masaya'. The first busload full of students, biologists, environmental enthusiasts and experts on flora and fauna arrived from Managua. Two more buses arrived later on that morning. They all came to celebrate this year’s Biodiversity Action Day in the Park. The objective of this special day was to show the biological diversity in Nicaragua, its beauty, and its ecological, economic and cultural value. The different groups were guided by scientists and specialists from Nicaragua.


The first group to arrive were the bird watchers. They headed off to the Coyote Trail, equipped with binoculars, cameras and notebooks. They were to walk a one-kilometre transect, identifying the bird species living in the dry forest habitat. The group was guided by Nicaraguan bird experts José Manuel Zolotoff, Roger Mendieta, Salvadora Morales and Martin Lezama. José explained to the group what a transect was, how the checksheet should be filled in: Bird species, male or female where possible, whether it was seen or heard, and how to estimate if a bird was heard within 25 metres of the observer or not (although this last needs a lot of experience !…). Within two hours, twenty-six species were recorded (ten of which were identified purely by their calls). Birds listed included White-throated Magpie-Jay (Calocitta formosa), Shrub Euphonia (Euphonia affinis), Squirrel Cuckoo (Piaya cayana), Blue-crowned Motmot (Momotus momota), Stripe-headed Sparrow (Aimophila ruficauda) and various humming birds.


The Vegetation Group had thirty-one enthusiasts and was guided by Alfredo Grijalva, one of the best known botanists in Nicaragua. This group worked in a patch of intact dry forest on the volcano’s slopes. Diversity is naturally fairly low in this vegetation type. Alfredo described the characteristics of the habitat and the use of some plant species found there. Examples included Gumbo-limbo (Bursera simaruba): it is hurricane-resistant, has a resin that is used for glue and for varnish, and its timber is used for light construction. The Coca bush (Erythroxylon spp.) is best known for its alkaloids, which include cocaine. Nance (Byrsonima crassifolia) is used against fever and diarrhea and is also an important food source for insects, hummingbirds and parakeets. Other plants are commonly used for hunting or fishing: Barbasco (Lonchocarpus utilis) is used to poison fish in waterways, and the branches of the Huevo de Chancho (Stemmadenia obovata) commonly used to produce bird-hunting slings. Many more examples of the importance of different plant species growing in this ecosystem were given - uses included food and shelter for people, birds, and insects, and medicinal plants and income-generators for local people.


Thirty-seven participants of the Reptile Group had an exciting time with Milton Salazar Saavedra and José Gabriel Martinez Fonseca. They found a Chantilla (Loxocemos bicolor), a species that had never before been recorded in this National Park. Milton (safely…) captured a venomous Central American rattlesnake (Crotalus simus), which is a - quite dangerous - typical inhabitant of tropical dry forests. José was lucky to come across a young Black Lizard (Ctenosaura similis), which was actually a greenish colour as camouflage.


Most of the mammal species in the park are nocturnal. On the night of the 21st May, a night excursion was led by Octavio Saldaña, Arnufo Medina, Carlos Cisneros y Milton Salazar for the Mammal Group. They set some live-traps along the Coyote trail and identified all species seen, heard, or caught in the traps. Three bat species were caught: Seba’s short tailed Bat (Carollia perspicillata), Palla’s Long-tongued bat (Glossophaga soricina) and as a surprise, a Hairy-legged Vampire (Diphylla ecaudata). This vampire was a new record for this National Park! The next morning a group of forty-three participants guided by Octavio and Arnulfo checked all the traps. The catch was a bit disappointing: they only caught a southern opossum (Didelphis marsupialis) and a southern cotton rat (Sigmodon hirsutus). But the group was very lucky to see some white-faced capuchin monkeys (Cebus capucinus) in the trees just in front of them. The game guards showed them fresh tracks of a white-tailed Deer (Odocoileus virginianus). Half way down the trail one of the participants almost stepped in fresh coyote dung! The coyote (Canis latrans) obviously had had some nice ripe mangoes the night before…


At the end of the Action Day all participants met in the auditorium of the eco-museum of the National Park to share the main outcomes of the 4 expeditions and to congratulate the winners of the photo competition: Rosemary Guendell (1), Salvadora Morales (2) and Anthony Palma (3)


As closing act one of the most famous singers of Nicaragua, Katia Cardinal (Duo Guardabaranca) and her daughter Alfonsina gave an ecologically-themed concert “Cantos al Sacuanjoche”.


To top

Excursión al Volcán Masaya

El Parque Nacional Volcán Masaya fue creado en 1979. Es el más grande (51Km2) y el segundo Parque Nacional en antigüedad en Nicaragua. La caldera Masaya es una de las más complejas de un conjunto anidado de calderas y cráteres formados hace alrededor de 2500 años. Desde entonces, un nuevo complejo basáltico se ha formado con las erupciones dentro de la caldera Masaya, que incluye los conos: Masaya, Santiago y Nindirí. La primera erupción registrada fue en 1670, la última grande fue en 1772. Una más moderada ocurrió en 1853. A lo largo del SXX el volcán hizo erupciones frecuentes pero moderadas; en el 2001 ocurrió una erupción menor, creando túneles volcánicos que desparramaron lava y rocas y fragmentos de rocas sobre la colina. En el 2003 una nube de erupción rosada alcanzó alrededor de 4.6 km. El Volcán Masaya continuamente emite grandes cantidades de gas de dióxido de sulfuro.


El volcán activo está rodeado de ásperas rocas negras, rocas volcánicas y áreas de bosque seco bien protegida. Ofrece una vista espectacular hacia el interior de un profundo cráter humeante y sostiene un ecosistema único dominado por la Flor Nacional de Nicaragua: Sacuanjoche (Plumeria alba, también conocida como Frangipani) y Cachito (Stemmadenia abovato). Colonias de pericos anidan en los hoyos en las paredes del cráter y varias especies de murciélagos viven en las cuevas y túneles de lava.


To top

El Día de Acción

En Mayo del 2010, el Ministerio del Ambiente y Recursos Naturales (MARENA), apoyado por la Red Nicaragüense de Biodiversidad (ReniBio), organizó el día de Acción por la Biodiversidad como parte de un foro nacional de 3 días sobre biodiversidad en Nicaragua: Esto incluyó una conferencia de 2 días (incluyendo simposio sobre manejo de áreas protegidas, manejo de humedales y monitoreo de biodiversidad) y un evento de dos días en 358 escuelas publicas en todo el país. Más de 14,500 escolares aprendieron acerca del valor de la biodiversidad y sembraron 17,500 árboles nativos. Las diferentes actividades fueron apoyadas por el Banco Mundial, PNUD y el Gobierno de Alemania.


El Parque Nacional Volcán Masaya fue escogido para el Día de Acción de la Biodiversidad por su ecosistema único, su buena infraestructura y facilidades, y su proximidad (20km) de la capital de Nicaragua, Managua.


A las 6 a.m. amanecía en el Parque Nacional Volcán Masaya el 22 de Mayo del 2010. El primer bus cargado de estudiantes, biólogos, ambientalistas entusiastas y expertos en flora y fauna llegaron de Managua. Dos buses más llegaron mas tarde esa mañana. Todos venían a celebrar este año el Día de Acción por la Biodiversidad en el Parque. El objetivo de este día especial fue mostrar la diversidad biológica en Nicaragua, su belleza, y su valor ecológico, económico y cultural. Los diferentes grupos fueron guiados por científicos y especialistas nicaragüenses.


El primer grupo que llego fue el de observación de pájaros. Se dirigieron al Sendero del Coyote equipados con binoculares, cámaras y cuadernos. Iban a caminar un transepto de 1 kilómetro, identificando las especies de pájaros viviendo en el hábitat del bosque seco. El grupo fue guiado por expertos en pájaros nicaragüenses José Manuel Zolotoff, Roger Mendieta, Salvadora Morales y Martín Lezama. José explicó al grupo que cosa es un transepto, como debía llenarse la lista patrón (especies de pájaros, hembra o macho -si es posible-, si fue visto o escuchado, y como estimar si un pájaro fue escuchado dentro de 25 metros del observador o no (aunque esto requiere de mucha experiencia!...). Al cabo de dos horas, veintiséis especies fueron registradas (diez de las cuales fueron identificadas puramente por sus llamadas). Los pájaros enlistados incluyen Urracas (Calocitta formosa), Eufonía Gargantinegra (Euphonia affinis), Cuco Ardilla (Piaya cayana), Guardabarranco Azul (Momotus momota), Sabanero Cabecilistado (Aimophila ruficauda) y varios tipos de colibríes.


El Grupo de Vegetación tuvo treinta y un entusiastas y fue guiado por Alfredo Grijalba, uno de los botánicos mas conocido en Nicaragua. Este grupo trabajo en una mancha de bosque seco intacto en las laderas del volcán. La diversidad es naturalmente baja en este tipo de vegetación. Alfredo describió las características del hábitat y el uso de algunas especies de plantas allí encontradas. Los ejemplos incluyeron Jiñocuabo (Bursera simaruba): es resistente a huracanes, tiene una resina utilizada para pegar y barnizar, y su tronco es usado en construcciones livianas. La hoja de Coca (Erythroxylon spp.) es bien conocida por sus alcaloides, que incluyen cocaína. Nance (Byrsonima crassifolia) utilizada contra la fiebre y diarrea y también es fuente de alimento importante para insectos, colibríes y pericos. Otras plantas son usadas comúnmente para cazar o pescar: Barbasco (Lonchocarpus utilis) es usado para envenenar peces en las vías fluviales y el Huevo de Chancho (Stemmadenia obovata) que comúnmente es usado para hacer huleras y cazar pájaros. Muchos mas ejemplos de la importancia de las diferentes especies de plantas creciendo en este ecosistema fueron dados, usos incluyeron comida y abrigo para la gente, pájaros e insectos, y plantas medicinales y generadoras de ingreso para la gente local.


Treinta y siete participantes del Grupo de Reptiles tuvieron momentos emocionantes con Milton Salazar Saavedra y José Gabriel Martínez Fonseca. Ellos encontraron un Pitón Americano de Pico Puntiagudo (Loxocemos bicolor), una especie que nunca había sido registrada en este Parque Nacional. Milton (cuidadosamente...) capturo una -venenosa y bastante peligrosa- Cascabel Centroamericana (Crotalus simus), que es un habitante típico de los bosques secos tropicales. José tuvo la suerte de cruzarse con una joven Lagartija Negra (Ctenosaura similis), camuflada de color verdoso.


La mayoría de las especies mamíferas en el parque son nocturnas. En la noche del 21 de Mayo, una excursión nocturna conducida dirigida por Octavio Saldaña, Arnulfo Medina, Carlos Cisneros y Milton Salazar para el Grupo Mamíferos. Ellos colocaron algunas trampas vivas a lo largo del sendero del Coyote e identificaron todas las especies vistas, oídas o capturadas en las trampas. Tres especies de murciélagos fueron capturadas: Murciélago de Cola Corta (Carollia perspicillata), Murciélago de Lengua larga (Glossophaga soricina) y como sorpresa, un Vampiro de Patas Peludas (Diphylla ecaudata). ¡Este vampiro es un nuevo registro para el Parque Nacional! A la mañana siguiente, un grupo de cuarenta y tres participantes guiados por Octavio y Arnulfo revisaron todas las trampas. La captura fue un poco decepcionante: ellos solo cogieron un Zorro Pelón (Didelphis marsupialis) y una Rata Algodonera (Sigmodon hirsutus). Pero el grupo tuvo mucha suerte de poder ver algunos Monos Cara Blanca (Cebus capucinus) en los árboles justo enfrente de ellos. Los guardabosques les mostraron huellas frescas de venado cola blanca. A medio camino, bajando el sendero, uno de los participantes ¡casi pisa una boñiga fresca de Coyote! Obviamente, el Coyote (Canis latrans) tuvo buenos mangos maduros la noche anterior.


Al final del Día de Acción todos los participantes se reunieron en el auditorio del eco- museo del Parque Nacional para compartir los principales resultados de las 4 excursiones y felicitar a los ganadores del concurso de fotografía: Rosemary Guendell (1), Salvadora Morales y Anthony Palma.


Como acto de clausura una de las mas famosas cantantes de Nicaragua, Katia Cardenal (Dúo Guardabarranco) y su hija Afonsina ofrecieron un concierto de tema ecológico, “Cantos al Sacuanjoche”.


To top

Links

Further information


To top

Downloads

Memoria_Foro_2010.pdf

Illustrated brochure by the MARENA about Nicaragua's three-day national forum on biodiversity, with extensive coverage of the Action Day (Spanish, 48 pages).

3.5 M

Nicaragua_-_Species_found.pdf

List of main species found during the Biodiversity Action Day in Nicaragua.

66 K

Biodiversidad_Revista_Nicaraguense.pdf

"Biodiversidad Revista Nicagaüense" de MARENA, Maio del 2010 (español, 128 páginas)

13.5 M

To top

Video

Flash is required!

To top

Gallery

Masaya volcano

Masaya dry forest

Horse testical flower

Participant

Coyote trail

Birdwatchers

Magpie Jay

Cinnamon Hummingbird

Cinnamon Hummingbird

Rattle snake

Wild pineapple

Participants

Burrowing python

Burrowing python

Burrowing python

Rattle snake

Coyote trail

Investigating

Coca

Coyote dung

Larves on leave

Young plant

Insect nest

Snake shot

Black Lizard juvenile

Short-tailed bat

Final act

Minister Juana Argenal

To top

Photos: Antoni Palma, Rosemary Guendell, José Sandigo, Martha Sanchez, Karin von Loebenstein